September 2nd, 2010

Mid-Hurricane Season Review

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

As the U.S. 2010 hurricane season reaches its midpoint, we present links to all GCCapitalIdeas stories that appeared covering U.S. hurricanes and tropical storms.

Tropical Storm Fiona:  Close on the heels of Hurricane Earl, Tropical Storm Fiona formed at 21:00 UTC on August 30 and is currently located approximately 440 miles (705 kilometers) east of the Leeward Islands, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Fiona packs sustained winds of around 40 mph (65 kmph). The storm is traveling in a west-northwest direction and is expected to move toward the northwest with a decrease in forward speed during the next day or so. This track would take Fiona northeast of the Leeward Islands on early Wednesday. The NHC has reported tropical storm-force winds extending 140 miles (220 kilometers) northeast from the center.

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Update: Hurricane Earl:    Earl remains a category three hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), with the center of the storm presently located around 170 miles (270 kilometers) east-northeast of San Salvador and around 725 miles (1,170 kilometers) south-southeast of Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. Earl is currently packing sustained winds of 125 mph (205 kmph) and is moving towards the northwest at around 17 mph (28 kmph). The NHC reports that this general motion is set to continue today, with the storm making a gradual turn to the north-northwest thereafter. According to the NHC, the center of Earl is forecast to track well east and northeast of the Bahamas today and tonight, and will approach the North Carolina coast by late Thursday ( September 2). At present, hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles (150 kilometers) and tropical storm winds extend outward up to 200 miles (325 kilometers) from the center of the storm.

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Update: Hurricane Danielle:    Hurricane Danielle, the strongest hurricane of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season, strengthened to a Category Four storm today. According to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), the storm is currently located approximately 480 miles (770 kilometers) southeast of Bermuda. Danielle is moving in a north-westerly direction with maximum sustained winds of around 135 mph (215 kmph). The storm is predicted to turn toward the north on Saturday, with the center of the hurricane passing well east of Bermuda on Saturday night. According to the NHC, some additional strengthening is possible in the next 24 hours. Hurricane-force winds have been reported up to 60 miles (95 kilometers) from the center of the storm while tropical storm-force winds extend 205 miles (335 kilometers) from the center.

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Tropical Storm Colin:   Tropical Storm Colin, the third named storm of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season, developed at 09:00 UTC today and is currently located approximately 945 miles (1,525 kilometers) east of the Lesser Antilles, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Colin packs sustained winds of around 40 mph (65 kmph). The storm is traveling in a west-northwest direction and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 24 to 48 hours as the storm slightly strengthens. The NHC said tropical storm-force winds extend 35 miles (55 kilometers) from the center of the storm.

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Tropical Storm Bonnie:   Tropical Storm Bonnie, the second named storm of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season, developed on July 22 and is currently located approximately 155 miles (250 kilometers) southeast of Miami in Florida, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Bonnie packs sustained winds of around 40 mph (65 kmph). The storm is traveling in a west-northwest direction and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 24 hours as the storm slightly strengthens. The NHC said tropical storm-force winds extend 85 miles (150 kilometers) from the center of the storm.

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Update: Hurricane Alex:   Hurricane Alex made landfall near Soto La Marina and La Pesca in Mexico’s Tamaulipas State at around 02:00 UTC on July 1 (22:00 on June 30 local time) with sustained winds of around 105 mph (165 kmph), equivalent to a category 2 hurricane, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). The NHC said Alex was the first hurricane to reach category 2 status in June in the Atlantic since Hurricane Alma in 1966. At landfall, the NHC said hurricane-force winds extended 70 miles (110 kilometers) from the center of the storm while tropical storm-force winds extended 205 miles (335 kilometers), the NHC said. Early estimates of insured losses suggest the insurance industry could payout between USD100 million and USD200 million for the damage caused by Alex.

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2010 Hurricane Season Begins:  Knowing, Understanding and Better Managing the Risks:  The 2010 hurricane season kicked-off on June 1 and the meteorological forces wasted no time in getting down to business. Tropical storm Agatha slammed into Central America, killing at least 101 people. The hurricane season kick-off and the storm occurred as backdrops to the wrap up of the June 1, 2010 reinsurance renewals, traditionally centered on the Florida property marketplace.

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