Posts Tagged ‘Casualty’



February 27th, 2017

Managing Volatility Key To Solvency II Transition: Part II

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

paire-eric-sm1Eric Paire, Head of Global Partners & Strategic Advisory, EMEA

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“To remain competitive, smaller companies simply cannot afford to operate at 200 percent. This volatility on multiple fronts means that establishing the solvency level that will provide a sufficiently robust capital buffer to withstand these fluctuations is extremely difficult. Is it 130 percent, 150 percent, 170 percent or higher?” notes Eric Paire, Head of Global Partners & Strategic Advisory, EMEA at Guy Carpenter.

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February 23rd, 2017

Managing Volatility Key To Solvency II Transition: Part I

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

paire-eric-smEric Paire, Head of Global Partners & Strategic Advisory, EMEA

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Movement Within Capital Ratios Leading to Uncertainty Amongst Mid-Size Companies

The impact of the Solvency II capital ratio on composite life and property/casualty balance sheets is proving more substantial than some companies initially expected, according to Eric Paire, Head of Global Partners & Strategic Advisory, EMEA at Guy Carpenter. This development is due to the double impact of market volatility and volatility within the solvency ratio itself.

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February 22nd, 2017

Solvency II Equivalence In The International (Re)insurance Landscape: Part IV: Asia Pacific Solvency II Equivalence

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

andrew-cox-953graham-jones-102x1173lobel_myra-sm-1174eddy-vanbeneden-sm-1175sumner-sm-1173Andrew Cox, Managing Director; Graham Jones, Senior Vice President; Myra E. Lobel, Managing Director; Eddy Vanbeneden, Managing Director and Steven Sumner, Oliver Wyman, Actuarial Consulting

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Solvency II’s reach and influence extends to Asia Pacific, as Japan and Australia attained provisional third country equivalence status for Group Solvency (Article 227). This status is valid for ten years and reduces the administrative burden for the Solvency II calculation of subsidiaries in the European Economic Area (EEA).

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February 21st, 2017

Solvency II Equivalence In The International (Re)insurance Landscape: Part III: The US and Solvency II Equivalency

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

andrew-cox-952graham-jones-102x1172lobel_myra-sm-1172eddy-vanbeneden-sm-1172sumner-sm-1172Andrew Cox, Managing Director; Graham Jones, Senior Vice President; Myra E. Lobel, Managing Director; Eddy Vanbeneden, Managing Director and Steven Sumner, Oliver Wyman, Actuarial Consulting

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Separate but related negotiations continue between the EC, European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority, and in the United States, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) and the Federal Insurance Office (FIO).

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February 20th, 2017

Solvency II Equivalence In The International (Re)insurance Landscape: Part II

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

andrew-cox-951graham-jones-102x1171lobel_myra-sm-1171eddy-vanbeneden-sm-1171sumner-sm-1171Andrew Cox, Managing Director; Graham Jones, Senior Vice President; Myra E. Lobel, Managing Director; Eddy Vanbeneden, Managing Director and Steven Sumner, Oliver Wyman, Actuarial Consulting

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The Solvency II Directive sets out three distinct areas for equivalence:

  1. Reinsurance
  2. Group Solvency
  3. Group Supervision

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February 16th, 2017

Solvency II Equivalence In The International (Re)insurance Landscape: Part I

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

andrew-cox-95graham-jones-102x117lobel_myra-sm-117eddy-vanbeneden-sm-117sumner-sm-117Andrew Cox, Managing Director; Graham Jones, Senior Vice President; Myra E. Lobel, Managing Director; Eddy Vanbeneden, Managing Director and Steven Sumner, Oliver Wyman, Actuarial Consulting

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The concept of equivalence under Solvency II determines to what extent (re)insurance entities outside Europe can operate within the European Union (EU) while relying solely on their local solvency standards. The ability to operate in the EU is a significant issue that impacts multinational (re)insurance companies and groups.

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February 15th, 2017

The U.S. Financial and Professional Insurance Market in 2017: 10 Trends to Watch

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From cyber risk to the changing regulatory landscape to increasing liability challenges for directors and officers, risks continue to evolve within the financial and professional liability insurance marketplace. What’s in store in the year ahead? Continue reading…

February 14th, 2017

Chart: Solvency II Ratios as of End of H1 2016

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Chart presents (re)insurers’ Solvency II ratios compiled by Guy Carpenter for the first half of 2016. Many companies publish their solvency ratios without being required to do so, and some others actually specify target solvency ratio ranges as part of their risk appetite and financial targets. Solvency ratios are another metric for investors to use when assessing the relative financial strength of companies - and (re)insurance buyers can do the same when assessing counterparty risk.

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February 6th, 2017

Evolving Risks Landscape: 2008—2017

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Social and environmental risks have supplanted economic ones as issues of greatest concern among respondents to the Global Risks Perception Survey. The survey was completed by almost 750 members of the World Economic Forum’s global multistakeholder community and the results analyzed in the World Economic Forum 2017 Global Risks Report, which was published by the World Economic Forum with support from Marsh & McLennan Companies and other partners.

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February 2nd, 2017

Public Sector Risk Financing Perspectives – Terror Risk: Part IV

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

emma-karhan-sm1Emma Karhan, Managing Director

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Insurance is about the pooling of risk and providing support for impacted economies. Expanding insurance coverages to achieve these objectives against terror losses requires a more granular level of insight into the impacts of terrorist attacks. We have a relatively high level of loss impact knowledge for mature lines of business, such as property catastrophe coverages; this has been driven by losses and the ensuing needs for modeling and pricing improvements. However, the terrorism market is a less mature market that has not suffered a frequency of significantly large insured losses that would otherwise assist in a better understanding of the nature of the peril and its direct and indirect impacts on an economy. Additionally, this peril has the added complexity of unpredictable behavioral factors of terrorists that are very difficult to sensibly and consistently be included in pricing models. Consequently, the (re)insurance industry needs to devise improved transparency through innovative modeling and pricing methodologies to ensure that capital continues to support this line of business - underpinning further product development.

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