Posts Tagged ‘johnny Chan’



May 20th, 2014

Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre Publishes New Annual Report

Posted at 2:00 PM ET

The Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre (GCACIC), a joint initiative of the City University of Hong Kong and Guy Carpenter, today released its fifth annual report presenting the highlights of the GCACIC’s research activities from the past year. The report details the findings of 16 projects conducted by the GCACIC, which focus on climate problems in the Asia-Pacific region as well as on a global scale.

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September 2nd, 2013

Rising Sea Levels Ranked as the Greatest Climate Change Threat

Posted at 9:00 PM ET

thumbnail-climateGuy Carpenter & Company released today an analysis of the evolving risk landscape spurred by global warming. Climate change, global warming and the resulting landscape shift for risk management is a growing area of concern among governments, the general public, the private sector and the (re)insurance industry at large. According to the report, global warming is an established scientific fact that cannot be explained by natural variability alone.

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May 20th, 2013

Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre Publishes Fourth Annual Report on Climate Issues

Posted at 4:00 PM ET

The Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre (GCACIC), a joint initiative of Guy Carpenter and City University of Hong Kong, today released its fourth annual report presenting the findings of the GCACIC’s research activities from the past year. The report details the findings of 22 projects conducted by the GCACIC, which focus on climate problems in the Asia-Pacific region as well as on a global scale.

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July 2nd, 2012

Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre Publishes Third Annual Report on Region’s Climate

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

The Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre (GCACIC), a joint initiative of Guy Carpenter & Company and City University of Hong Kong, released its third annual report, which presents the findings of the 27 research projects conducted by GCACIC members on climate issues in the Asia-Pacific region in 2011.

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June 27th, 2011

Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre Publishes Second Annual Report on Region’s Climate

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre (GCACIC), a joint initiative of Guy Carpenter & Company, LLC and City University of Hong Kong, released its second annual report, which presents findings from 19 research projects that were conducted by GCACIC members on climate issues in the Asia-Pacific region in 2010.

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June 9th, 2011

Normal Tropical Cyclone Season Predicted for Western North Pacific in 2011, According to Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre

Posted at 9:00 PM ET

Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre (GCACIC), a joint initiative of Guy Carpenter & Company, LLC and City University of Hong Kong, issued its annual predictions for the 2011 tropical cyclone season for Western North Pacific, a region that includes China, Japan and Korea.

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September 1st, 2010

Global Warming Does Not Lead to More Typhoons

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Johnny Chan, Dean, School of Energy and Environment, and Director, Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre City University of Hong Kong
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Introduction

Particularly since the devastation of New Orleans caused by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, many people believe that global warming could lead to more frequent occurrences of intense hurricanes like Katrina. This conclusion seems to be intuitively obvious. Global warming not only leads to increases in air temperature, but the ocean temperatures will rise as well. A warmer ocean will cause more evaporation of ocean water into the atmosphere. The energy that is absorbed by the water molecules going into the atmosphere will subsequently be released through condensation of the water vapor. Because tropical cyclones (called typhoons in Asia and hurricanes in the Atlantic) are huge cloud systems over the ocean, more evaporation, and subsequently more condensation, means that more energy is available for the tropical cyclones to develop. Thus, it seems obvious that under a global warming scenario, not only should the frequency of occurrence of tropical cyclones increase, but they should also become more intense.

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