Posts Tagged ‘risk management’



February 17th, 2015

Guy Carpenter Appoints Matthew Eagle as Head of International Analytics

Posted at 11:30 PM ET

Guy Carpenter today announced the appointment of Matthew Eagle as Managing Director and Head of International Analytics for Guy Carpenter. 

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February 10th, 2015

Managing Counterparty Risk

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Guy Carpenter helps our clients manage the specific counterparty risk elements associated with collateralized markets. The credit analysis of collateralized markets is different than the analysis of a traditional reinsurer.

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February 3rd, 2015

GC Videocast - Reinsurance Solutions

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Andrew Cox, Capital Optimization, Guy Carpenter, and Niall Clifford, Financial Strategy Group, Mercer, explore a number of reinsurance solutions available to insurance companies in the fourth video installment of the Holistic Balance Sheet Management series.

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January 28th, 2015

GC Videocast - Linking Risk Appetite to Strategy

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

In the second video in the Holistic Balance Sheet Management series, Andrew Cox, Capital Optimization, Guy Carpenter and Niall Clifford, Financial Strategy Group, Mercer, explore how companies should approach investment risk and the link between investment strategy, risk appetite and reinsurance strategy. A key focus for insurance companies should be to link their investment strategy with their risk appetite metrics. While any increase in return on capital may seem very attractive, it is important that companies ensure that the risks they are taking are in line with their risk appetite and that they are aware of their constraints, allowing them to take risks in a measured way. Investment strategy should be considered alongside regulatory requirements, as a key aspect of Solvency II relates to how well each company understands the risks in its portfolio.

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January 27th, 2015

GC Videocast - Introduction to Holistic Balance Sheet Management

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

A holistic approach that optimizes the use of the two traditionally separate areas of balance sheet management within the current market environment has proven to be extremely challenging for non-life insurers. The key issue for non-life insurers is how to boost return on capital in a continuing low-yield environment. In the first of the Holistic Balance Sheet Management series, Andrew Cox, Capital Optimization, Guy Carpenter, and Niall Clifford, Financial Strategy Group, Mercer, discuss how insurance companies may optimize their capital while addressing their concerns over economic capital, earnings risk, ratings agency requirements and increasing constraints due to Solvency II.

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December 22nd, 2014

Understanding Emerging Risks: Imperative for the Future

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

The downside focus of risk measures highlights what could be a key problem with the debate around emerging risks - when people think about risk they only consider the downside. Cars, penicillin, fossil fuels, the internet - all of these were once emerging risks, and they have caused global destruction through car accidents, antibiotic resistance, climate change, and now, possibly through cyber risk. But they have also brought far better travel, longer and much healthier lives for almost everyone, affordable electricity for people in their own homes, and an explosion of information on a scale never seen before available freely at the click of a button.

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December 4th, 2014

Casualty Catastrophe Risk Modeling: Part II

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Casualty catastrophe occurrences have become increasingly common over the past decade. The recent 2008 financial catastrophe is the easiest to cite, due to its sheer size and the fact that it continues to unfold even today. But, there have been many others. The collapse of the “dotcom economy” led to scandals around initial public offering laddering and equity analyst conflicts of interest. Accounting firms were not alone in suffering financial loss related to such debacles as Enron, WorldCom, Tyco and Adelphia. While insured losses did not reach those of property catastrophes, economic damages were profound. Enron’s loss of USD66 billion in market capitalization alone - not including the economic damage caused to other companies - was more than double that of Hurricane Ike (approximately USD30 billion). The financial catastrophe is estimated to have caused economic damage of above USD1 trillion, with more likely to follow. When considered in the context of the Deepwater Horizon industrial accident, the casualty catastrophe that unraveled from the largest US offshore energy event over the past 40 years was by no means remote. Beyond the initial property loss of the actual drilling rig, liability risk in paying claims continues to extend and ripple throughout the supply chain involved as well as the environmental impact to numerous coastal and commercial businesses. Asbestos litigation, perhaps the longest casualty catastrophe on record, has paid out over USD70 billion and by some accounts may be entering its third wave. Therefore, asbestos is an emerging crystalizing risk that needs to be continuously monitored, measured and modeled for those who continue to be exposed to it.

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November 24th, 2014

Modeling Terrorism

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Modeling methodologies for terrorism have been continually refined and updated since the three major modeling companies - AIR Worldwide (AIR), EQECAT and Risk Management Solutions (RMS) - released their first terrorism models in 2002. Quantifying the economic, insured and human losses from a terrorist attack continues to pose major challenges for (re)insurers and alternative capacity providers. There are three main techniques to model terrorism risk:

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November 18th, 2014

Emerging Risk: Periodic Payment Orders

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

For a number of reasons the United Kingdom represents an extreme example of the impact of annuity compensation structures. For severe bodily injury cases it is now highly likely that the claimant will opt for an annuity structure (known as a periodic payment order, or PPO) rather than a lump-sum. These are often indexed accordingly to the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) (1). As a consequence, the uncertainties that had previously been transferred to the claimant are now retained by the insurer (and to a certain extent, its reinsurers). Unlike an individual claimant, the insurer needs to articulate these risks in its capital modeling. These risks can be categorized as follows:

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November 12th, 2014

Cyber Coverage: Directors & Officers (D&O) Liability

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Cyber coverage is also having an effect on directors and officers (D&O) liability in the United States. Oversight and increased requirements for disclosure on cybersecurity are making D&O coverage more important than ever. With the rise of data breaches and other cyber-attacks, directors and officers are responsible for making sure that they are taking sufficient steps to protect their company’s digital assets. In the case of a data breach, directors can be hit with shareholder suits and shareholder derivative actions claiming that the directors breached their fiduciary duty to the company for failing to put adequate cyber security measures in place.

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