Posts Tagged ‘Thailand’



November 2nd, 2014

Demand for Asia Pacific Catastrophe Reinsurance Remains High in 2014

Posted at 3:30 PM ET

Guy Carpenter today published a new report highlighting the continued increase in 2014 of total Asia Pacific catastrophe limit purchased. However, a confluence of factors, including the weakening of some key zone currencies has meant that reinsurance premium spend in the region has declined significantly.

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October 29th, 2014

Guy Carpenter Publishes Flood Risks in Asia — A Detailed Study

Posted at 4:30 PM ET

Guy Carpenter today released a new report titled Flood Risk in Asia - A Detailed Study. The report provides an in-depth study of the flood potential in Asia along with the prevention and protection systems in place.

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November 4th, 2013

Guy Carpenter Extends Coverage of Industrial Park Database to Include Vietnam, Malaysia and South Korea

Posted at 4:30 PM ET

In 2011, Thailand experienced its worst flooding in years with insured losses estimated at around USD15 billion,(1) of which the Thai General Insurance Association attributed more than 90 percent arising from commercial risks located within industrial parks. As industrial parks are common in several countries in the region, Guy Carpenter developed a database of digitized boundaries of these parks to support its clients’ ability to analyze the potential for catastrophic losses arising from exposures located within park boundaries.

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April 9th, 2013

April 1 Renewals See Reinsurance Pricing Stabilize Amid Dynamic Capital Growth

Posted at 11:28 PM ET

Guy Carpenter reports that dynamic capital growth and ample reinsurance capacity resulted in a relatively stable renewal at April 1, 2013. In a briefing released today, Guy Carpenter comments that the convergence of traditional and alternative capital sources is changing the marketplace, with non-traditional capacity now making up an estimated 14 percent of global property catastrophe limit.

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February 11th, 2013

Supply Chain Risk

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Here we review the recent GC Capital Ideas stories that have dealt with supply chain risk. 

Contingent Business Interruption: Life Support for Industry:  the insurance industry contemplates the concept of supply chain risk, questioning whether it is a threat or an opportunity. The industry is undecided whether CBI coverage should be enthusiastically marketed as a positive differentiator or consigned to the “accommodation business” category. 

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Global Losses of 2011 Changed the Perception of Risk: Over the last few years, the global (re)insurance sector has seen significant increases in cold spot catastrophe losses. This growing trend refers to exposures in territories that have historically been considered non-peak zones and are unmodeled or inadequately modeled. It is also a by-product of the increasingly global economy in which (re)insurers operate and the growing demand for (re)insurance in emerging and developing territories.

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Thailand Flood 2011: Executive Summary: In 2011, Thailand experienced its worst flooding in years, leaving more than 800 people dead and causing severe damage across northern and central regions of the country. The floods, lasting a few months, severely damaged and disrupted manufacturing operations in Thailand.

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Guy Carpenter Asia Pacific Catastrophe Report 2012; Executive Summary: The Thai floods emphasized the need not only to understand asset concentrations better but also the fragility of global supply chains. Not only were these property damage losses modeled on a rudimentary basis if at all, but business interruption losses and supply chain disruption were completely unmodeled.

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Global Perils: The Tohoku earthquake/tsunami and the Thai floods revealed risks that (re)insurers had not previously considered, with CBI claims - resulting from supply chain failure - accounting for a large share of insured losses.

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February 6th, 2013

Flood Risks and Flood Events in Asia Pacific

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Here we gather recent GC Capital Ideas posts that focus on flood risk and flood events in the Asia Pacific region. 

Floods in Eastern Australia:  Ex-tropical cyclone Oswald tracked over parts of Queensland and New South Wales in eastern Australia between January 23 and January 30, resulting in widespread damage from flooding, severe storms and tornadoes.

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Increased Flood Loss Potential: Making use of all available tools and practicing comprehensive exposure management will both strengthen (re)insurers’ ERM practices and allow them to make informed risk management and reinsurance decisions as they enter new markets. Certainly, flood risk is prevalent and increasing in almost every developing economy.

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Flood Risks in Emerging Markets: Despite such important model limitations for earthquakes, the lack of modeling solutions for flood risks poses an even greater threat to (re)insurers. As illustrated by Figure 7 below, flood risk is poorly modeled at a global level by the three main modeling companies, particularly in developing countries where flooding is a regular occurrence.

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Guy Carpenter Develops Database of Industrial Estates in China, Taiwan, Thailand and Indonesia: In 2011, Thailand experienced its worst flooding in years, which severely damaged and disrupted manufacturing operations in seven large industrial parks. Due in large part to the significant concentration of insured values in these parks, total insured loss from the 2011 flood is estimated to be in the range of USD15 to USD20 billion.

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Guy Carpenter Asia Pacific Catastrophe Report 2012; Executive Summary: At the time we were publishing our 2011 Asia Pacific Catastrophe report, there was a growing realization that losses from the Thai flooding ongoing at the time were going to be significant. The Thai flood losses came at the end of a run of losses in the Asia Pacific region that were large, unprecedented in recent times and possibly unexpected by many market participants.

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Thailand Flood 2011: Executive Summary:  In 2011, Thailand experienced its worst flooding in years, leaving more than 800 people dead and causing severe damage across northern and central regions of the country. The floods, lasting a few months, severely damaged and disrupted manufacturing operations in Thailand. Flooding also forced seven huge industrial estates in central regions to close, causing damage to the industrial sector in the billions of U.S. dollars.

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November 27th, 2012

How Guy Carpenter Can Help: Catastrophe Risks in Developing Economies

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

David Flandro, Global Head of Business Intelligence, Julian Alovisi, Assistant Vice President and Lucy Dalimonte, Senior Vice President
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Guy Carpenter is uniquely positioned to help clients successfully grow their business in emerging markets. Our GC Global Analytics and Advisory team offers services and solutions that include industry-leading risk analytics, strategic and technical advice and capital advisory. We employ over 300 modeling, actuarial and advisory professionals through our GC Analytics®**, Global Advisory and GC Securities* teams who closely collaborate with Guy Carpenter’s global broking force to deliver the best insights and growth opportunities to our clients. We encourage you to contact your Guy Carpenter representative to review and discuss your modeling, advisory and capital needs in more detail. Among the specific services and tools we utilize and offer are proprietary modeling, the i-aXs® data management platform, MetaRisk®, portfolio management, predictive analytics, advisory services and actuarial expertise.

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November 22nd, 2012

Increased Flood Loss Potential

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

David Flandro, Global Head of Business Intelligence, Julian Alovisi, Assistant Vice President and Lucy Dalimonte, Senior Vice President
Contact

Making use of all available tools and practicing comprehensive exposure management will both strengthen (re)insurers’ ERM practices and allow them to make informed risk management and reinsurance decisions as they enter new markets. Certainly, flood risk is prevalent and increasing in almost every developing economy. Recent studies by Swiss Re (1) and the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (2) suggest flood loss potential will grow as emerging economies continue to prosper.

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November 21st, 2012

Flood Risks in Emerging Markets

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

David Flandro, Global Head of Business Intelligence, Julian Alovisi, Assistant Vice President and Lucy Dalimonte, Senior Vice President
Contact

Despite such important model limitations for earthquakes, the lack of modeling solutions for flood risks poses an even greater threat to (re)insurers. As illustrated by Figure 7 below, flood risk is poorly modeled at a global level by the three main modeling companies, particularly in developing countries where flooding is a regular occurrence.

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November 6th, 2012

Global Perils

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

David Flandro, Global Head of Business Intelligence, Julian Alovisi, Assistant Vice President and Lucy Dalimonte, Senior Vice President
Contact

As Table 1 shows, the three perils of wind, earthquake and flood have caused the heaviest losses to (re)insurers. While hurricanes in the United States have unsurprisingly generated the biggest wind losses, the most expensive earthquakes and floods have a more international flavor. Indeed, the most expensive earthquake loss and flood loss on record occurred last year in Japan and Thailand, respectively. Moreover, both the Tohoku earthquake/tsunami and the Thai floods revealed risks that (re)insurers had not previously considered, with CBI claims - resulting from supply chain failure - accounting for a large share of insured losses. High impact, low frequency events (such as earthquakes and tropical cyclones) and perils that typically are more regular (such as floods) are widespread in several developing markets, raising the prospect of more hidden loss potential.

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