Posts Tagged ‘Thomas Herde’



September 15th, 2010

Guy Carpenter Examines Annuities in Europe, Periodical Payment Orders, Intellectual Property Trends in Asia

Posted at 2:00 AM ET

casualtybriefing2010_thumbnailA new briefing released today by Guy Carpenter examines emerging issues in the global casualty reinsurance marketplace. Key issues highlighted in the report include the changing role of annuities used in third-party bodily injury claims settlements in Europe, the growing trend of UK courts to award rest-of-life structured settlements and the emerging market for intellectual property (re)insurance in Asia.

Click here to download the briefing >>

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September 8th, 2009

Environmental Insurance in Asia – A Profound Opportunity

Posted at 6:00 AM ET

Thomas Herde, Senior Vice President
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The environmental liability insurance market in Asia is poised for growth. Limited resources support a large and rapidly growing population, which has resulted in a considerable environmental toll. In China and Japan in particular, the effects of pollution are potent and proliferating. Some legal measures are emerging in an effort to reduce behaviors that cause environmental damage. With the establishment of liability, there is a salient role for (re)insurers in these markets. Despite challenges around data availability and a small existing market for environmental liability insurance, the long-term opportunity is profound, especially for early market entrants.

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January 9th, 2009

International Casualty Update: January 1, 2009 Renewal

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Thomas Herde, Senior Vice President
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Casualty treaty reinsurance pricing outside the United States and UK was unchanged in most areas, though there were pockets where prices rose - despite the shrinking of many cedents’ premium incomes. Programs in specific classes (such as Financial Institution) or with deteriorating reinsurance results sustained the highest price hikes. Cedents did have access to an increasingly diversified group of reinsurance markets, putting pressure on established traditional reinsurers. Many are beginning to turn over their reinsurance panels, and the London and European branches of Bermudian reinsurers are the primary beneficiaries - at the expense of the traditional European reinsurers.

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October 29th, 2008

Litigation Financing Makes Plaintiff Pockets Deeper

Posted at 6:00 PM ET

Thomas Herde, Senior Vice President
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The specter of American-style class action litigation looms large over Continental Europe. Many carriers worry that they could face larger claims—and increased legal fees—if this practice is adopted. Litigation financing is particularly daunting, as it provides a way to funnel capital to plaintiffs to support long, intense legal campaigns.

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October 18th, 2008

American Justice in Europe? The Rise of Class Actions

Posted at 6:03 PM ET

Thomas Herde, Senior Vice President, Casualty
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Justice may be assuming a new visage in Continental Europe. American-style class action litigation is on the horizon. Judges and juries still have their respective roles to play, but the nature of the plaintiff is evolving. The “class action” concept is crossing the Atlantic, bringing with it the potential for longer and costlier litigation and the risk of higher claims. While ambulances are not yet being chased across the continent, (re)insurers are beginning to wonder if they will be stuck with the bill for this emerging trend.

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September 8th, 2008

Class Action, Contingency Fees, Litigation Funding, and All That Jazz – European Law à l’Américaine?

Posted at 4:30 PM ET

Thomas Herde, Senior Vice President
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A lot of ink has already been spilt over Europe’s changing claims landscape and the possible consequences for insurers and reinsurers. Recent developments not only suggest that the doors are open for European investors to participate in (and have the benefit of) US securities class actions, but also that the very beast itself eventually will find its way into the European legal system.

Are we at the beginning of a litigation explosion where ambulance-chasers create and fight over a European claims market? Is it the insurance industry which ultimately will finance “affordable justice for all”?

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