Posts Tagged ‘tropical cyclone’



August 8th, 2014

Iselle And Julio: Update

Posted at 2:24 PM ET

ts-iselle-8-8-small1Tropical Storm Iselle made landfall at about 2:30 a.m. HST (1230 UTC) today along the Kau Coast on the Big Island, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC). Maximum sustained winds at landfall were 60 mph, with higher gusts especially at higher elevations. Iselle was moving slowly leading to excessive rainfall accumulations. Resulting flooding has been extensive, together with reports of downed trees and power lines for affected areas. Roads are blocked with debris and downed trees, and power outages have affected at least 33,000. Some roof damage has been reported. There are no reports of deaths or major injuries.

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August 7th, 2014

Hawaii Double Threat: Hurricanes Iselle and Julio

Posted at 3:30 PM ET

hawaii-smallHurricane Iselle is poised to become the first hurricane in 22 years to make a direct landfall in Hawaii. According to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC), Iselle is located 305 miles east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii and 510 miles east-southeast of Honolulu, Hawaii. It has already started raining in Hilo and conditions are expected to deteriorate through the day, with the onset of tropical storm conditions this afternoon and hurricane conditions tonight. Trailing Iselle is Hurricane Julio. Julio is presently 1,235 miles east of Hilo, Hawaii. Julio is expected to impact the area shortly following Iselle, but with some uncertainty concerning the expected track and impacts.

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July 22nd, 2014

2014 Tropical Cyclone Landfall Predictions

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

A recent study shows it is possible to use a regional climate model to more accurately predict the number of tropical cyclone formations compared to predictions based solely on a global climate model. 

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July 21st, 2014

Atlantic Hurricane Season: What We Know Can Happen — Historical Impacts: Hurricane Betsy

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Hurricane Betsy made landfall on Key Largo, Florida, in 1965 with estimated winds of 125 mph — a Category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale — before entering the Gulf of Mexico.

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July 17th, 2014

Atlantic Hurricane Season: What We Know Can Happen — Historical Impacts: Hurricane Andrew

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Hurricane Andrew made U.S. landfall in 1992. The storm originated from a tropical wave and experienced disruptive wind shear until arriving in the West Atlantic. Once in the West Atlantic, Andrew first reached hurricane status on the morning of August 22 and then developed explosively into a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale with maximum sustained winds of 165 mph when it made landfall on Florida’s coast.

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July 16th, 2014

Atlantic Hurricane Season: What We Know Can Happen — Historical Impacts: Hurricane Charley

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

Hurricane Charley made U.S. landfall in 2004 with maximum sustained winds of 145 mph, a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. Storm surge of six to seven feet was observed near Sanibel and Estero Islands, Florida.

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July 15th, 2014

Chart: U.S. Landfall To Basin Ratio — Detected Hurricanes (1900-2013)

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

The chart indicates that the proportion of hurricanes counted in the Atlantic Basin and those that made landfall has been very volatile through the years. While there is indeed a weak correlation between hurricane counts in the Atlantic Basin and the number of U.S. landfalls, statistical significance is a subject of some debate in the scientific community (Coughlin et al., 2009; Dailey et al., 2009).

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July 14th, 2014

2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season Part III: What Are We Preparing For Anyway?

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

james-waller2James Waller, Ph.D, Research Meteorologist

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Any hurricane can produce wind, surge and inland flood impacts. The severity and scope of impacts is not always consistent with ratings on the Saffir-Simpson scale, particularly for surge as we have seen with Katrina (2005) and Sandy (2012).

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July 10th, 2014

2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season Part II: El Niño Phenomenon

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

james-waller1James Waller, Ph.D., Research Meteorologist

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The El Niño phenomenon is signaled by warmer than normal sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropical East Pacific. The large-scale circulations associated with El Niño enhance wind shear (changing wind speed with height) in the tropical Atlantic. The enhanced wind shear disrupts tropical cyclone formation, generally associated with fewer tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Basin. The suppressing effects of El Niño are found to be strongest in the deep tropics (Kossin et al., 2010).

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July 9th, 2014

2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season Part I: One Never Truly Knows

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

james-wallerJames Waller, Ph.D, Research Meteorologist

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The 2004 hurricane season was a weak El Niño year, which brought five landfalling U.S. hurricanes, four of which affected Florida.

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