Posts Tagged ‘Waller (James)’



January 9th, 2018

2017 North Atlantic Hurricane Season

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

james-wallerJames Waller, PhD, Research Meteorologist

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The 2017 North Atlantic Hurricane season was one of the most active seasons on record, a historic season in many respects, and certainly an impactful one. Those most severely affected residents are facing a long and difficult recovery that could last for years. They continue to have our thoughts and concerns.

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January 17th, 2017

Further Considerations on the Hurricane “Shield” Theory

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

james-wallerJames Waller, Ph.D, Research Meteorologist

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A recent New York Times article titled “Conditions That Form More Hurricanes Also Protect U.S., Study Finds” (1) notes a hurricane “shield” for the U.S. coast during busy hurricane seasons. The article, based on recent research by James Kossin, (2) provides valuable insight, including some notes of caution from other experts in the field, but the observations should be treated with a moment of pause. Some key points to consider:

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March 21st, 2016

Guy Carpenter Cites El Niño and North Atlantic Oscillation as Key Climate Drivers in 2015

Posted at 11:30 PM ET

Guy Carpenter today reported that 2015 marked one of the strongest El Niño periods on record, while a positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) was evident both at the beginning and close of the year.

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October 26th, 2015

Guy Carpenter Examines U.S. Wildfire Risk

Posted at 3:15 AM ET

Guy Carpenter today released a new briefing that assesses wildfire risk in the United States. The briefing, U.S. Wildfire: An Ever Present Hazard, provides insight into the ongoing threat of wildfires in the U.S. as well as risk mitigation strategies and portfolio modeling for this peril.

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June 22nd, 2015

Guy Carpenter Releases 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Briefing

Posted at 10:49 PM ET

Guy Carpenter today released a briefing on the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season. According to the report, hurricane activity for the Atlantic Basin is projected to be below average for the 2015 season although impactful landfalls can occur in any hurricane season, even those of reduced activity.

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February 24th, 2015

2014 Insured Losses Hit Lowest Level in Five Years

Posted at 11:45 PM ET

Guy Carpenter today released its annual Global Catastrophe Review, which reports that insured losses in 2014 were at the lowest level seen since 2009. According to the report, significant insured losses in 2014 totaled approximately USD33 billion, a dramatic drop when compared to the historic insured losses seen in 2011, which totaled approximately USD126 billion.

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October 25th, 2014

Hurricane Seasons That Changed The Industry: Landmark 2005 Hurricane Season

Posted at 7:30 AM ET

Guy Carpenter & Company released Part II of the two-part Ten-Year Retrospective of the 2004 and 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Seasons. Part II focuses on the 2005 hurricane season and the cumulative impacts of both the 2004 and 2005 seasons on the (re)insurance industry as well as the changes made in response to these two landmark seasons from both catastrophe model vendors and rating agencies.

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July 14th, 2014

2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season Part III: What Are We Preparing For Anyway?

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

james-waller2James Waller, Ph.D, Research Meteorologist

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Any hurricane can produce wind, surge and inland flood impacts. The severity and scope of impacts is not always consistent with ratings on the Saffir-Simpson scale, particularly for surge as we have seen with Katrina (2005) and Sandy (2012).

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July 10th, 2014

2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season Part II: El Niño Phenomenon

Posted at 1:00 AM ET

james-waller1James Waller, Ph.D., Research Meteorologist

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The El Niño phenomenon is signaled by warmer than normal sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropical East Pacific. The large-scale circulations associated with El Niño enhance wind shear (changing wind speed with height) in the tropical Atlantic. The enhanced wind shear disrupts tropical cyclone formation, generally associated with fewer tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Basin. The suppressing effects of El Niño are found to be strongest in the deep tropics (Kossin et al., 2010).

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